Druid Gratitude Practices – Nature Shrines and Offerings

The Druid's Garden

Black Raspberry in fruit Black Raspberry in fruit

Every year, I look forward to the black raspberries that grow all throughout the fields and wild places where I live. These black raspberries are incredibly flavorful with with crunchy seeds. They have never been commercialized, meaning no company has grown them for profit. You cannot buy them in the store. You can only wait for late June and watch them ripen and invest the energy in picking. Each year, the black raspberries and so many other fruits, nuts, and wild foods are a gift from the land, the land that offers such abundance.  If I would purchase such berries in a store, my relationship with those berries would be fairly instrumental–I pay for them, they become part of a transaction, and then I eat them. There is no heart in such a transaction.  But because these berries can’t be bought or sold, when I pick…

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Wildtending: Refugia and the Seed Arc Garden

The Druid's Garden

Over the course of the last six months, I’ve been discussing in various ways philosophies and insights about helping to directly and physically heal our lands as a spiritual practice, weaving in principles of druidry, permaculture, organic farming, herbalism, and more. Specifically, I’ve suggested that we can have direct, meaningful, and impact benefit on our lands and through the work of our “healing hands” we can help heal the extensive damage caused by humanity. The reason is simple: we have lost so much biodiversity in so much of our landscapes; even our forests are in many cases, pale representations of what they once were in terms of biological diversity. This is true of tree species, plant species, animal species, insect life, soil biology, mycology, water-based life and so on.  While nature has the ability to heal herself, with the help of humans, she can do it much more…

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The Druid’s Garden Refugia Project – Site Preparation & Garden Map

The Druid's Garden

In my last twoposts, I shared the philosophy of wildtending–the idea that we can nurture and regenerate the lands around us as a spiritual practice. In this post, I wanted to share the start of a new garden–a refugia garden–that I’ve been working on since the early summer when I moved to PA. It will show some basic strategies for taking a damaged piece of land, full of garbage, debris, and common plants, to a garden focused on biodiversity, rare and medicinal plants, and the developing of a “seed arc” for spreading these plants back into our native ecosystem. I’ll be updating you a few times on this garden as it progresses into its first season.

As I am currently landless in my transition from Michigan to Pennsylvania, I’m using a small chunk of land on my parents’ property for this garden. I thought it was an appropriate…

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Third Full Moon of Winter 2019

Elder Mountain Dreaming

By Phoenix of Elder Mountain –This is our last Full Moon of Winter of the seasonal year, which begins on Feb. 19th at 0 degrees Virgo, joined by the Royal fixed star Regulus at 0 degrees Virgo. Degrees at the zero points are a signature of new beginnings and with Spring now on its way, our new beginning (rebirth) and mother earth’s rebirth at the equinox is right on time. Set your one full moon “release” intention wisely based on what no longer serves your highest good within you.

My new moon intention this moon was “I Am Magical” and I changed it later that day to “I Am Magical in a safe and healthy way.”A few days after the new moon, because I added “safe and healthy” to my intention, I took an energetic hit to my right rib cage area, when I was speaking with someone who…

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15 Herbs You Can Grow Indoors

I grow Rosemary, basil and thyme. You can also plant these outside and they usually do very well. Great tips.

Deep Green Permaculture

romemary-plant-indoor-pot

Herbs are easy to grow and have many great health benefits, we can use them in the kitchen, for making refreshing teas, or as natural remedies to make us feel better.

Herbs can be grown in all spaces, from the smallest balcony to the biggest garden. There are herbs suitable for growing in dry areas, wet areas, shade or sun. You can easily produce more plants easily from cuttings, and you can use the herbs you grow in your daily life.

If you think you have no space to grow anything edible, then think again! Even a sunny kitchen window will do the trick if you choose the right plants to grow.

Indoor Herbs

Here is a list of plants which can be grown in a pot, planter or any other type of suitable container in a reasonably bright window.

  1. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) – leaves used fresh or…

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A Seed Starting Ritual for Nourishment, Connection, and Relationship

I’ve recently started seedling growing in paper coffee cups. Once the seedlings outgrow their cup nursery, I put them in larger parts. Sometimes I like to pick weaker plants at nurseries and nurse them back to health. It promotes a bond with them. As a servant of Gaia, bonding with seeds, trees and Earth fills me with great energy.

The Druid's Garden

All of the potential and possibility of the world is present in a single seed.  That seed has the ability to grow, to flourish, to produce fruit and flowers, to offer nutrition, magic, and strength.  Seed starting offers us a chance to connect deeply with the seeds we plant, and to , from the very beginning, establish and maintain sacred relationships with our plant allies. Seed starting is a truely magical druidic practice, and in today’s post, I want to talk a bit about the magic of seed staring and share a simple ritual that you can do to bless your seeds as you plant them. Some of my earlier posts on seed starting can be found here (a general philosophy of seeds from a druidic perspective) and here (recycled materials for seed starting).

Seeds coming up! Seeds coming up!

One of the most important parts of a druid practice, in my opinion…

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Sacred Tree Profile: Juniper’s Medicine, Magic, Mythology and Meanings

The Druid's Garden

Here on the East Coast of the USA, we are still in deep winter. Soon, the maples will be flowing.  Soon, the winter snows will melt.  Soon, spring will return.  But until that time, the conifers, particularly offer strength and wisdom.  One of my favorite conifers is Juniper, also known as Eastern Red Cedar.  It is delightful to come across a wild juniper in the winter months, with her sweet and pine-scented berries and her delightful sprigs that offer friendship and hope through the darkest times.  So come with me today as we explore the sacred Juniper tree.

Juniper here on the land Juniper here on the land

This post is part of my Sacred Trees in the Americas series, where I explore sacred trees within a specifically American context, drawing upon folklore, herbalism, magic, and more!  I think it’s particularly important that US druids and those following other nature-based paths in North America understand…

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